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40 hadith | Kube Publishing

Posts Tagged ‘40 hadith’

Pre-Ramadan Reading List

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves, Read in Ramadan

Ramadan is coming up, or has already passed (depending on when you’re reading this!), here’s a reading list to help you prepare for the holy month.

The first book we primarily recommend and suggest is of course, The Holy Qur’an. Whether you’ve maintained your connection to the holy book from the previous Ramadan or are struggling, now is a time to start, maintain or improve your current connection. Whether it’s a few verses or few pages it’s important to get into the habit before Ramadan arrives.

Pre-Ramadan Reading List!

 

Tazkiyah – The Islamic Path Of Self-Development

Tazkiyah (Purification) There is hardly any book in English that covers self-development from an authentic Islamic perspective. Yet, tazkiyah, self-development, lies at the core of Islamic life and there is need for a practical manual to assist those who want to achieve self-development by purifying their souls and actions. A perfect spiritual yet practical guide, to help you ease into Ramadan or to work on self purification.

 

Al-Adab Al-Mufrad (with full commentary) – Adil Salahi

“I have only been sent to perfect good moral character.” Prophet Muhammad (sws)

The Perfect Code of Manners and Morality By Imam Bukhari – A must have for understanding the importance of character and for those on the road who want to perfect it.

This anthology of 1329 hadiths is a treasured work in Muslim history by one of its most respected scholars, Imam Bukhari. All of the hadith are directly related to the standards of manners and morality Islam wants to prevail and Muslims throughout the world have been guided by it since its preparation over a millennium ago.

This edition includes a contemporary commentary on each topical collection of hadiths, clearly emphasising the relevance of the Prophet’s teachings in our modern and complex societies. This pioneering addition marks it out as perhaps the first English work commenting on and explaining a full anthology of hadiths.

Read a sample – More info  – Available here – Amazon

 

In The Early Hours – Khurram Murad

In the Early Hours is a collection of inspirational advice by Ustadh Khurram Murad on the subject of spiritual and self development. In it he sets out the goal of the Believer – the single-minded desire to seek the good pleasure of God. He then outlines the methods and instruments which must be used in the attainment of that ultimate goal. A great book to read after Fajr… in the early hours!

Available here – Kindle edition 

 

Revive Your Heart – Nouman Ali Khan

Revive Your Heart is a call for spiritual renewal and an invitation to have a conversation with one of the world’s most recognisable voices on Islam, Nouman Ali Khan. This collection of essays is disarmingly simple, yet it challenges us to change— to revise our actions, our assumptions, and our beliefs so we can be transformed from within, as well as externally. It aims to help modern Muslims maintain a spiritual connection with Allah and to address the challenges facing believers today.

Amazon 

Kindle edition

Read a sample

 

Inner Dimensions Of Islamic Worship – Al-Ghazali

This book covers the Islamic rituals of worship; Prayer, Alms-giving, Fasting, Pilgrimage, etc. which are essential to the fulfilment of inner quality. A very helpful and inspiring reminder from Al-Ghazali to countless young men and women of our times, who are rapidly growing their commitment to Islam.

Available here – Kindle edition

 

 

 

A Treasury Of Hadith –  A Commentary on Nawawi’s Selection of Prophetic Traditions

Imam Nawawi’s collection of 42 hadith brings together some of the most important and pivotal Prophetic traditions. Each tradition encapsulates a great rule of the religion of Islam, described by Islamic religious scholars as an ‘axis’ in Islam.

Available here – Read a sample

5 Hadith on developing character – Reminders from the Sunnah

Written by R on . Posted in Uncategorized

Here are five Hadith on developing and maintaining righteous character:

  1. An-Nawwas ibn Sam’an reported: The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said:

الْبِرُّ حُسْنُ الْخُلُقِ وَالإِثْمُ مَا حَاكَ فِي صَدْرِكَ وَكَرِهْتَ أَنْ يَطَّلِعَ عَلَيْهِ النَّاسُ

Righteousness is good character and sin is what waivers in your heart and you hate for people to find out about it. Sahih Muslim 2553,

2.  Abu Huraira reported: The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said:

مَنْ كَانَ يُؤْمِنُ بِاللَّهِ وَالْيَوْمِ الْآخِرِ فَلَا يُؤْذِي جَارَهُ

Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, let him not harm his neighbour. Sahih Bukhari 6110,

3. Umar ibn Al-Khattab reported: The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said:

إِنَّمَا الْأَعْمَالُ بِالنِّيَّةِ وَإِنَّمَا لِامْرِئٍ مَا نَوَى فَمَنْ كَانَتْ هِجْرَتُهُ إِلَى اللَّهِ وَرَسُولِهِ فَهِجْرَتُهُ إِلَى اللَّهِ وَرَسُولِهِ وَمَنْ كَانَتْ هِجْرَتُهُ لِدُنْيَا يُصِيبُهَا أَوْ امْرَأَةٍ يَتَزَوَّجُهَا فَهِجْرَتُهُ إِلَى مَا هَاجَرَ إِلَيْهِ

Verily, deeds are only with intentions. Verily, every person will have only what they intended. So whoever emigrated to Allah and His Messenger, then his emigration is for Allah and His Messenger. Whoever emigrated to get something in the world or to marry a woman, then his emigration is for whatever he emigrated for. Sahih Bukhari 54,

 

4. Abu Huraira reported: The Messenger of Allah, peace and blessings be upon him, said:

مَنْ كَانَ يُؤْمِنُ بِاللَّهِ وَالْيَوْمِ الآخِرِ فَلْيَقُلْ خَيْرًا أَوْ لِيَصْمُتْ وَمَنْ كَانَ يُؤْمِنُ بِاللَّهِ وَالْيَوْمِ الآخِرِ فَلْيُكْرِمْ جَارَهُ وَمَنْ كَانَ يُؤْمِنُ بِاللَّهِ وَالْيَوْمِ الآخِرِ فَلْيُكْرِمْ ضَيْفَهُ

Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, let him speak goodness or remain silent. Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, let him honour his neighbour. Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, let him honour his guest. Sahih Muslim 47,

5. In another narration, the Prophet said:

وَمَنْ كَانَ يُؤْمِنُ بِاللَّهِ وَالْيَوْمِ الْآخِرِ فَلْيَصِلْ رَحِمَهُ

Whoever believes in Allah and the Last Day, let him uphold his family ties. Sahih Bukhari 5787,

 

These Hadith are from Imam Nawawi’s collection of 40 Hadith, which brings together some of the most important and pivotal Prophetic traditions. Each tradition encapsulates a great rule of the religion of Islam, described by Islamic religious scholars as an ‘axis’ in Islam. The commentary of the great Hadith master Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Daqiq al-‘Id is simple but erudite and was the first prepared on Imam Nawawi’s collection.

More information on the book is available on our website and Amazon

Islamic Manners – A Brief Reminder

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

Islamic Manners

On the authority of Abu Hurayrah, may God be well pleased with him, who reported that the Messenger of God, may God’s blessings and peace be upon him, said: ‘Whoever believes in God and the Last Day let him say something good or else keep quiet. And whoever believes in God and the Last Day let him honour his neighbour. And whoever believes in God and the Last Day let him honour his guest.’
[Narrated by Bukhari and Muslim]


His saying (whoever believes in God and the Last Day) means whoever believes fully, with a complete faith that saves from God’s chastisement and leads to God’s good pleasure, let him (say something good or else keep quiet). This is because the person who truly believes in God fears His threats, hopes for His reward and strives to do what He commands and refrains from what He prohibits. The most important thing in this process is to control his limbs which are his subjects and, therefore, he is responsible for them, as God Most High said, the hearing, the sight, the heart – all of those shall be questioned of [al-Isra 17: 36], not a word he utters, but by him is an observer ready [Qaf 50: 18].

 

The defects of the tongue are numerous. This is why the Prophet, may God’s blessings and peace be upon him, said: ‘Are people thrown in the Fire on their nostrils except for that which their tongues have reaped?’ He also said, may God’s blessings and peace be upon him: ‘All the speech of the son of Adam will be against him except for the remembrance of God Most High, enjoining the good and forbidding the wrong.’ Whoever knows this and truly believes in it will fear God with regard to his tongue and will only utter that which is good or else keep silent. One scholar mentioned that all the proprieties of goodness are derived from four prophetic sayings and he mentioned among them the saying of the Prophet, may God’s blessings and peace be upon him: ‘Whoever believes in God and the Last Day let him say something good or else keep silent.’


Another scholar said: ‘When a person wants to speak, he should first think: if what he is going to say is definitely good and he is going to be rewarded for it, then he should speak. Otherwise he should refrain from speaking whether what he is going to say appears to be unlawful, offensive or permissible. Hence, he is commanded to refrain from permissible speech, for it is recommended to do so, out of fear that it may lead him to speech that is forbidden or offensive, and this may happen quite frequently. God Most High said: not a word he utters, but by him is an observer ready [Qaf 50: 18].

 

The scholars have different views about whether everything uttered by a person is recorded, even if it happens to be permissible, or whether only that in which there is re-ward or punishment is recorded. The latter view is the view of Ibn Abbas and some other eminent scholars. The noble verse [Qaf 50: 18] is therefore of particular applicability to the speech that involves a requital. His saying (let him honour his neighbour… let him honour his guest) points to the rights of the neighbour and guest and the necessity of being kind to them and of protecting one’s limbs. In His Book, God Most High has enjoined being kind towards neighbours. The Prophet, may God’s blessings and peace be upon him, said: ‘Gabriel, peace be upon him, kept on enjoining me to take care of the neighbour until I feared he was going to make him among one’s inheritors.’

 

Giving hospitality is part of Islam as well as being the characteristic of the prophets and righteous people. Some scholars declared it to be an obligation, but most scholars are of the opinion that it is of the noble character traits.The author of al-Ifsah wrote: ‘Among the things that one understands from this prophetic saying is that honouring the guest is an act of worship, which is neither diminished by hosting a rich person nor is it changed by giving one’s guest whatever little one has. To honour a guest consists of showing him a happy manner and engaging him in good conversation. But the heart of offering hospitality lies in providing food. One has to hasten therefore to provide whatever God has made available without any display of affectation.’

 

The same scholar went on to mention a few things about offering hospitality until he said: ‘As for his saying (let him say something good or else keep quiet), this indicates that the utterance of that which is good is better than keeping quiet, while silence is better than saying something bad. Included in the utterance of what is good is to convey from God and from His Messenger, may God’s blessings and peace be upon him, teaching the Muslims, enjoining the good with full knowledge of what one is doing and forbidding the wrong also with full knowledge, reconciling between people and saying fair things to them. The best speech is to utter a word of truth in front of someone who is feared or sought in matters of substantiation [of claims] and settlement [of disputes].’

 

This excerpt is from ‘A Treasury of Hadith – A Commentary of Nawawi’s Selection of Forty Prophetic Traditions’ which is available here.

Sneak Peek: A Treasury of Hadith

Written by site_admin on . Posted in Trade Books

A Treasury of Hadith: A Commentary on Nawawi’s Selection of of Forty Prophetic Traditions

Ibn Daqiq al-Id

translated by Mokrane Guezzou

This classical short commentary on Imam Nawawi’s famous collection of forty-two traditions of the Prophet Muhammad, may Allah bless him and give him peace, is an authoratative introduction to key Islamic principles and teachings. Accounted as a hadith master, in this collection Imam Nawawi collated together those traditions that he considered were axial to the entire Islamic faith.

Translated in accessible English and presented in a beautiful gift format, this is a book to treasure.

Ibn Daqiq al-Id (d.1302) was a Shafi’i mujtahid imam, who was educated in Damascus, Alexandria and Egypt. Accounted as one of the greatest scholars in Islam in the fundamentals of law and belief, he wrote extensively in the areas of law, principles of jurispudence, hadith and tenets of faith.

Imam Nawawi (d.1277) was accounted as an Imam of the later Shafi’i school, and was known for his piety and knowledge.

 

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