Posts Tagged ‘islam’

Revive Your Heart with Nouman Ali Khan – New book by Bayyinah founder published by Kube

Written by R on . Posted in Author, Uncategorized

Being a Muslim today isn’t easy. Pushed, pulled and prodded from every direction, life can be disheartening and difficult to understand.

Revive Your Heart – written by Nouman Ali Khan – is an indispensable book, offering guidance that is both bold and heartfelt to modern Muslims navigating their way through a life that is ever more destabilising.

Nouman Ali Khan is one of the world’s most recognisable Muslims. At home in America, educated in the West and spiritually trained in the East, he is uniquely able to connect with modern Muslims; understanding the challenges they face, internally and externally, on a daily basis in the 21st century, from the rise of the alternative right to the complexities of family life.

This book is the result of his experiences – at home, in his community, and as a teacher – that combine to show us how to fulfil our faith, build healthy communities, purify our finances and respond to the rise of terrorism in the name of Islam.The vital point that runs through the book however, is more holistic: how to orientate ourselves so that we may find peace, and preserve through the difficult times that lie ahead.A path that, properly navigated, will revive a heart, transform a life and lead to success in both this life and the hereafter

The Kube Editor hopes that in a world that is abuzz with “unrelenting activity constantly vying for our attention” this book can “inspire modern Muslims to become sources of light in our world through the revival of their hearts.”


BOOK CONTENTS

PART I Connecting to Allah Through Du’a

PART II Creating a Cohesive Muslim Community

PART III Our Financial Dealings

PART IV Some Contemporary Issues

PART V Focusing on the Akhirah

 

ABOUT NOUMAN ALI KHAN

Nouman Ali Khan is a Muslim speaker and the CEO and founder of Bayyinah Institute, an institute that is dedicated to the teaching of Arabic and Qur’anic studies with over 10,000 students worldwide.

One of the best known Islamic speakers in the English Language. With a combined social media following of 2.5 million and 21 million YouTube video views for his Bayyinah Institute, Nouman is one of the most influential young western speakers. Nouman Ali Khan has been named one of the most 500 most influential Muslims in the world by the Royal Islamic Strategic Studies Centre of Jordon.

Available here.

 

READ A SAMPLE

Angels in Islam – by Razana Noor

Written by R on . Posted in Children's Books, Razana Noor

Angels in Islam

Allah (subhanahu wa ta’ala) has created many different types of creatures and one type of these creatures are called Angels (or‘al-Malaikah’ in the Quran).

We cannot usually see them and they are made of pure LIGHT. They only do whatever Allah (SWT) tells them to do and they cannot ever disobey God because unlike us humans, they have no choice of their own – they have no ‘Free Will.’

They pray, worship and glorify Allah all the time.

Belief in the Angels is a big part of our faith as Muslims, like the belief in ONE God and the belief in many Prophets of God. There are some very special angels who are given extra special tasks by Allah. Some of them are mentioned below.

  • Jibrael(Gabriel): He is a very important angel. He is the angel of revelation and he revealed the Quran to the Prophet Muhammad (SAW). He also communicated with all the Prophets and he is responsible for bringing down Allah’s blessings on Laylatul Qadr (The Night of Power) on one of the last 10 nights of Ramadan. He is responsible for bringing punishment to nations who do wrong. Jibrael (alayhis salaam) is mentioned in the Quran several times.

 

  • Mikael(Michael): Responsible for directing the rain and winds according to the will of Allah (SWT).

 

  • Israfeel: Responsible for blowing the trumpet that will signal the ‘End of Time’ on this earth.

 

  • Azrael: Also known as malak al-maut(Judeo-Christian, Azrael), is the angel of death. He is responsible for parting the soul from the body. He is only referred to as malak al-maut in the Quran, which means the angel of death.

 

  • Malik: The main guardian of hell.

 

  • Munkar and Nakeer:Stern angels who question humans upon death regarding their beliefs. They ask three questions: who is your God? Who is your Prophet? What is your Religion? They punish those in the grave who did not believe, or were bad and disobedient in their lives.

 

  • Haroot and Maroot:Two angels who came to earth and taught men some  ‘black magic’ such as breaking up family and marriage as a test.

 

  • Kirama Katibeen:These two angels sit on every person’s right and left shoulder to record his/her good and bad.sun-1383638_1920

 

What do Angels look like?

According to Quran and the Sunnah of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW), we know these facts about angels:

  • They are made of pure LIGHT, whereas the Jinn are made from fire, and mankind is from a type of ‘clay.’
  • The angels are very large.
  • They have wings, sometimes in pairs of two, three or four.
  • They are extremely beautiful, with the exception of the Angel of Death.
  • They are neither male nor female.
  • They can take on the form of humans.
  • The angels do not eat.

Q & A

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What are Angels made of?

Light

Can they ever be bad?

No. They have no ‘free will’ They ALWAYS carry out their duties and are obedient to Allah.

Do they eat and drink?

No. They do not need to. They were made to constantly glorify and praise Allah as well as carry out tasks given to them by Allah.

How many are there?

Too many to count.

Do they have wings?

Yes. Some have 2, 4 or even 100’s of wings.

How big or small are they?

They are gigantic – bigger than mountains, but they can come in human form.

Are Angels male or female?

Neither.

When do Angels come to a home?

Whenever they hear Allah being mentioned or they hear the Quran being recited, they fly over and protect that home. They LOVE listening to the Quran.

Bad Jinns (or Shayteen), are very afraid of angels because they can ZAP them with a ball of light.

When does an Angel leave the home?

Angels are very sensitive to bad words so if there is swearing going on they immediately leave. They also do not like pictures of humans or animals displayed on the walls or dogs living inside the home.


Check out ‘My Special Angels’ a children’s title that introduces the Kiraman and Katabin, the two noble scribes! written by Razana Noor and illustrated Omar Burgess.

Razana Noor

About the author: Razana was born and raised in Surrey, UK. She has a degree in Law and a diploma in Quran & Islamic Studies. Writing fun, entertaining Islamic children’s books is her passion!

The Rich Legacy of Libraries in Muslim Lands

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in News and events

The beginning of July saw the reopening of one of the world’s oldest libraries – the al-Qarawiyyin university library, located in Fez, Morocco.

This famous university – founded in the 9th century – recently underwent refurbishment and has now once again opened its doors to the public. The renovation has brought to light the unique and distinctive achievements of the library, which has recently caught the attention of the public.

But the concept of grand libraries, filled with precious manuscripts, scrolls and the works of many famous theologians and scholars is one that has long been synonymous with Islam. Libraries in Muslim lands – particularly during the ‘Golden Age’ – were once the envy of the world, and to this day, are associated with the place of Islam in history.

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However, despite this rich legacy, very little is really known about Muslim libraries in the present day.

Bearing this in mind, below we have compiled a list (not exhaustive!) of some sterling Islamic libraries, which deserve to be remembered for their luminous legacy around the world.

 

(In no particular order…)

 

  • Al-Qarawiyyin library – Fez, Morocco

Al-Qarawiyyin was founded in 859 AD, suggesting it has existed for over a millennium! This makes it one of the world’s oldest libraries.

The library was established by a woman by the name of Fatima al-Fihri, the daughter of a wealthy Tunisian merchant – and she actually attended the university herself.

Al-Qarawiyyin is part of one of the world’s oldest operating universities, and was the first degree-granting educational institute. It has approximately 4000 rare books and Arabic manuscripts, including Ibn Khaldun’s Muqaddimah and a 9th century Qur’an written in Kufic calligraphy.

The revamp includes a new area in the library for members of the general public to visit, making it an unmissable stop on your next trip to Morocco!

 

  • Alexandria library – Alexandria, Egypt

Possibly the most famous of them all, the library of Alexandria was popularly recognised as a centre for learning in the ancient world. It is believed to have contained a staggering 500,000 documents in its prime. Soaring at its highest when Egypt was under Muslim rule, the Alexandria university was a major centre for knowledge and was also part of a research institute.

Sadly, this ancient library no longer exists, with the exact cause for its destruction remaining a mystery.

 

  • Library of al-Hakam – Cordoba, Spain

The grand library of al-Hakam was located in Cordoba, Spain. Cordoba was the capital of al-Andalus – a famous centre of Islam during the ‘Golden Age’ (7th-13th century). Understood to have housed over 400,000 books, the pursuit of knowledge was taken very seriously in al-Hakam library. The fields of medicine, mathematics, astronomy and botany were in particular focus, and knowledge was regularly exchanged and expanded through contact with other Muslim cities like Baghdad.

Cordoba was central to the success of Islam during the ‘Golden Era’. The spread of knowledge though al-Hakam library meant Cordoba led the way to enlightenment for the rest of Europe.

 

  • Bait al-Hikmah, House of Wisdom – Baghdad, Iraq

Founded in 830 CE, Bait al-Hikmah consisted of a library, research institute and translation bureau. It was an institute famous for research and education, attracting various well-known scholars who came to share their culture and ideas. During this period, Baghdad was at its most successful financially and intellectually, and the House of Wisdom played a chief role in this.

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Bait al-Hikmah contained thousands of Greek and Roman manuscripts, and scholars were specifically employed to translate foreign works into Arabic. The primary focus was on translating works from the Greek literary canon, including Aristotle, Ptolemy and Plato, into Arabic. Al-Kindi – the famous Muslim Arab philosopher – wrote a large number of books for the library.

Rumour has it that when the books of Bait al-Hikmah were destroyed in the Tigris River during the Mongol invasion, the water ran pitch black due to the excessive ink that had run from the scrolls.

 

  • Sufiya mosque library – Aleppo, Syria

The Sufiya library, located in the Grand Umayyad mosque in Aleppo, was one of the oldest mosque libraries. Prince Sayf al-Daula – a local prince – bequeathed a magnificent 10,000 books to the library himself! Great pride was taken in maintaining the library, so much so that only the best scholars were employed as librarians.

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  • And many, many more

From the Zaytuna in Tunis to the famous al-Azhar in Cairo, the number of libraries in the Muslim world has been – and is – widespread. Many a library that was once shining with the light of knowledge has been forgotten under the shadow of time, and for many libraries, there are not many reliable historical facts readily available.

 

One of the unique factors that allowed Muslim lands to soar to such an intellectual height was the use of paper. Paper was invented in China in the first century, but the western world did not access it until long after the Muslims. Muslim merchants were one of the first to gain access to paper, allowing them to record, copy and spread knowledge. This put them far in front of everybody else.

It is clear to see the central role that Islamic libraries played in the development and spread of knowledge around the world. At a time when the rest of the world was still taking baby steps, the knowledge spread in Muslim lands was increasing in leaps and bounds, light years ahead of everyone else.

 

Kube: Behind the Scenes – Illustrations

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in Children's Books

Ever wondered what goes on behind the scenes when a book is being made?

It’s far too lengthy a process to be disclosed in one post… but today I’m going to share with you some exclusive behind-the-scenes material which explores (to some extent) how illustrations are developed for a book.

Meet Hassan and Aneesa.

 

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Eid Fun Day at the Islamic Foundation

Written by site_admin on . Posted in News and events

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Don’t miss the chance to be part of this amazing event, organised by the New Muslim Project, Leicester.

This event and the Dawud Wharnsby workshops are taking place on the same day. For people coming to the workshop, discounted tickets to this event are available.

BOOKING INFORMATION

Tickets are available on the door:

£6 per adult

£5 children 5-15 yrs

£2 children 4yrs and under

With tickets to a Dawud Wharnsby event £4 (children under 4 free)

If you would like to book in advance, please contact ruqaiyah@islamic-foundation.org.uk

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