Posts Tagged ‘kube publishing’

Prayers of the Pious ~ Giveaway!

Written by R on . Posted in Read in Ramadan

Giveaway is now closed!


 

This Ramadan we’ve got 10 signed copies of ‘Prayers of the Pious’ By Imam Omar Suleiman to give out! Click on the photo below below for your chance to receive a copy.

 

About Prayers of the Pious

Thirty short prayers taken from the Prophet Muhammad and his pious predecessors, brought together by an American Muslim making a difference, Omar Suleiman. Few people call out to Allah anymore. We have forgotten what it is to have a personal conversation with God, and how simple it is. Allah doesn’t care if it rhymes, or how it sounds, or even in what language you call out to Him. What’s important is how sincere it is. Imam Ahmad was once asked, what is the distance between us and the throne of God?

A pious prayer from a pure heart, was his reply, that’s how we connect to Allah. Through reading the personal prayers of the Companions of the Prophet, this book will remind you how to speak with Allah in the same way they did. How to call upon the Creator the same way they called upon Him. And by using the dua journal you can start a conversation with Allah, following in the footsteps of the pious predecessors.

100% of royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to Yaqeen Institute (non-profit) to support their research and activities for the global Muslim community.


** A valid email address is required for our team to respond to the winners **

(5 UK winners + 5 International winners will be selected)

Giveaway is closed!

 

 

 

Prayers of the Pious By Omar Suleiman

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves, Read in Ramadan

 

Praise for the Book

“In this concise work, Sh. Omar Suleiman has collected many precious gems from the du`as of the righteous. The reader cannot help but get swept away in the spiritual earnestness that these beseechers felt. Animated by these timeless invocations, I pray that all of us can not only use these classical prayers ourselves, but be inspired to produce our own, from the depths of our hearts, so that our du`as, too, can be heard by the Almighty.”  Yasir Qadhi

The series impacted me more than I can explain, it was transformational, because it made me think about the level of attachment I have with my conversation with Allah.

Duas are very private, very special and very much needed – but for the first time I started to think about how much focus I had to put on my choice of words and not just my actual plea. The need was/will always be there, for Allah to grant me more and more, but the way I ask can change, depending on how I ask HimGilded Dunya

“beautifully designed..compilation of duas and reminders by Imam Omar Suleiman” ReciteReflect

“With 30 prayers this will be ideal for Ramadan and something that In Sha Allah will be readable. The plan is to focus on one prayer a day and reflect on it…and get the eldest involved too! The book is also a handy size to read on the go!” Muslim Mummy

 

About Prayers of the Pious

Thirty short prayers taken from the Prophet Muhammad and his pious predecessors, brought together by an American Muslim making a difference, Omar Suleiman. Few people call out to Allah anymore. We have forgotten what it is to have a personal conversation with God, and how simple it is. Allah doesn’t care if it rhymes, or how it sounds, or even in what language you call out to Him. What’s important is how sincere it is. Imam Ahmad was once asked, what is the distance between us and the throne of God?

A pious prayer from a pure heart, was his reply, that’s how we connect to Allah. Through reading the personal prayers of the Companions of the Prophet, this book will remind you how to speak with Allah in the same way they did. How to call upon the Creator the same way they called upon Him. And by using the dua journal you can start a conversation with Allah, following in the footsteps of the pious predecessors.

100% of royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to Yaqeen Institute (non-profit) to support their research and activities for the global Muslim community.

 

Look Inside

About the Author

Imam Omar Suleiman is the Founder and President of the Yaqeen Institute for Islamic Research and Professor of Islamic studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, USA.

 

Watch the series

 

Buy the book here or from Amazon

Prayers of the Pious by Imam Omar Suleiman

ISBN: 9781847741295 ~ Hardback ~ £6.99

Striking a balance between during Ramadan..

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

3. Striking the balance between the objectives of worship and keeping things easy

Scholars have different views about whether a traveller in Ramadan should fast or not. There are Hadiths which appear superficially contradictory, as they state that on certain occasions God’s messenger (peace be upon him) observed the fast when travelling but he did not fast on other occasions. Muslim enters in his Ṣaḥīḥ a narration by Ibn ‘Abbās saying: ‘Do not criticise anyone who fasts or anyone who does not. God’s Messenger fasted on some journeys and did not fast on others.’32 Muslim also relates in his Ṣaḥīḥ a Hadith narrated by Ibn ‘Abbās saying: ‘God’s Messenger started his journey during the Year of the Conquest in Ramadan.

He fasted until he reached al-Kudayd, but he did not fast after that.’ Commenting on this Hadith, Ibn Shihāb al-Zuhrī holds– as Muslim reports – that the ruling that permits fasting during travel is ‘abrogated’, because the narration stating that the Prophet (peace be upon him) did not fast on this journey was the later practice. It was in the year that Makkah fell to Islam. Ibn Shihāb said: ‘Not fasting was the last practice, and we take the Prophet’s latest action… His Companions used always to follow the latest, considering it to be definitive and abrogating any earlier ruling.’ However, Muslim also includes a Hadith which combines the two options in a better way than keeping the choice open as Ibn ‘Abbās’s narration suggests. Abū Sa‘īd al-Khudrī reports: ‘We used to go on expeditions in Ramaḍān with God’s Messenger (peace be upon him). Some of us would be fasting and some would not. None who fasted blamed any who did not fast, and those who were not fasting did not blame those who fasted. They all considered that the one who felt himself strong enough to fast did well and the one who did not fast, feeling his lack of strength, did well.’

This view links worship to the status of the individual. For the one who feels himself strong keeping up the worship is better, while the easier option of not fasting is better for the one who felt himself not strong enough. Striking the balance between the two objectives of attending to worship and opting for what is easy is an essential feature of Islamic law. When hard acts of worship become too hard for a person, a concession is always given, within the framework of Islamic law.

This excerpt is from ‘A Critique of the Theory of Abrogation’ by Jasser Auda

Available here.

Who is Omar Suleiman?

Written by R on . Posted in News and events

Imam Omar Suleiman is an American Muslim scholar, civil rights activist and speaker. He’s the Founder and President of the Yaqeen Institute for Islamic Research, and an Professor of Islamic Studies at Southern Methodist University. He is also the Resident Scholar of the Valley Ranch Islamic Center and the Co-Chair of Faith Forward Dallas at Thanks-Giving Square. He has been dubbed “The Religious Leader Dallas Needs” by the D Magazine. As well as considered one of the most influential Muslims in America by CNN.

He holds a Bachelors in Accounting, a Bachelors in Islamic Law, a Masters in Islamic Finance, a Masters in Political History, and is currently pursuing a Phd. in Islamic Thought and Civilization.

Shaykh Omar has taught Islamic Studies at the university level since 2008. As a valued Al-Maghrib instructor, Shaykh Omar developed one of the most successful seminar’s “An In-Depth Study of the Spiritual Practices of the Best Generations”. He also is one of the main speakers at our various conferences and retreats across the globe.

With his charismatic sermons and message of inclusiveness, he’s gained a national following and with the media he’s one of the creators of the internationally acclaimed “Inspiration Series” which has reached millions of Muslims and Non Muslims through YouTube and Islamic Television stations worldwide. He’s also known for his series on Quran weekly as well as his contributions to Hadith of the Day.

 

New Islamic Activity Books

Written by R on . Posted in Children's Books

This year we’ve released a new activity book series based on the Prophets of Islam.

Each book is filled with colourful illustrations, fun filled activities and a Hadith or verse of the Qur’an to reflect on.

 

Authored by Saadah Taib

Illustrated by Shazana Rosli

 

 

Prophet Muhammad and The Crying Camel

9780860376347 – Paperback

 

Prophet Adam and The Wicked Iblis

9780860376392 – Paperback

The Fantasy of Growth – Signs of the Earth

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

The Fantasy of Growth

The ‘Holy Grail’ Everything that comes into existence grows, matures, flourishes, perishes and finally decays. Then, if the conditions are right there is renewal. These are unalterable universal laws; growth is the flip-side of development. The maturing and flourishing dimensions are the developmental aspects of growth. In another sense the terms ‘development’ and ‘growth’ are interchangeable, but in economics they have specific meanings, like in the sentence: ‘Development is dependent on growth.’ But we can have development without growth. That is, improving our state of well being without economic growth; without the accumulation of material possessions that, in their increasing manufacture and use contribute to a degraded planet. We need to differentiate between quality and quantity and ask if possessions can improve the quality of life. Up to a point, perhaps, when they can relieve us of our daily drudgery. But beyond that we succumb to greed, euphemistically described today as consumerism; a state by which we measure our self-worth through the things we possess, capitulating to advertising techniques designed to leave us addicted to wanting more stuff.

This is the consequence of denying ourselves the secret we call contentment, an essential ingredient for happiness. The extreme example of the desire to possess is the millions the rich spend on works of art. Somehow the possession and display of these artefacts give their owners a sense of power and importance, and perhaps happiness. Growth has become the holy grail of the nation state in these times; it is the driver that provides the raison d’être of the modern world. One never ceases to hear about economic growth, as if this was the universal remedy that would deliver to the human race the good life it seeks. Politicians are sold on the growth agenda because this is how they can make their contribution to improving the living standards of their people. This is, after all, what they were elected to do and if they succeed they remain in power. The project is to enhance their appeal to the electorate, and this is the underlying reason why it has been difficult to reach agreement on climate change discussions.

Reducing carbon footprints means curbing growth rates, and who is going to be the first to do that? This is why the United States did not ratify the Kyoto protocol in 2005, and Trump provides us with a textbook example of how this is done: tell people the lie they want to hear and scupper international agreements ostensibly in the national interest.

International agencies like the World Trade Organisation (WTO) constantly promote growth. As Roberto Azevêdo, the Director-General of WTO, declares in his concerns for the environment, the fact cannot be ignored that the principle concern of his organisation is economic growth. Economists always promote growth because it is part of their belief system, and in their reckoning the environment is relegated to second place. As we move into unexplored territory a new jargon appears: the ‘ecology of investment’, and in this idea investors sensitive to climate change look for growth opportunities in the development and application of renewable energy.

The media, which with a few exceptions is part of big business, supports the growth agenda to the hilt. One only has to look at the financial pages in the newspapers. The following headline appeared in the Telegraph of 30 September 2014: ‘IMF: Infrastructure spending spree last chance to revive growth – International Monetary Fund describes public infrastructure spending as “one of the few remaining policy levers available to support growth”’.

This is an organisation in which its chief officer has declared her grave concerns regarding climate change. To bring this up to date, the latest IMF assessment published in October 2017 makes this observation in its Executive Summary: ‘For 2018, the upward revision (a reference to its foregoing analysis) mainly reflects an expectation that the authorities will maintain a sufficiently expansionary policy mix … to meet their target of doubling real GDP between 2010 and 2020.’

The full title of this report is World Economic Outlook, October 2017: Seeking Sustainable Growth (Short-Term Recovery, Long-Term Challenges). It would be pertinent to ask here if sustainable growth is the same as sustainable development? It quite clearly is not and this raises another question. Is the IMF paying heed to the idea of sustainability that UNDP is taking so
much pain to advocate? These are mixed messages coming from reputable international agencies and only confirms my two-world theory: conservationist versus expansionist.
If we draw a line starting with Adam Smith, the father of modern economics (late eighteenth century) and work our way through John Stuart Mill, economic theorist and moral philosopher (early nineteenth century), and Alfred Marshall, whose Principles of Economics was taught in universities till the 1920s, we discover that economic growth per se didn’t receive any serious mention until the middle of the twentieth century, when economic historian Walt Whitman Rostow made a serious study of this subject in its own right.

He saw the rate of growth as a ‘function of changes in two enormously complex variables’: Output, that is scale and productivity of the workforce; and, capital, which he describes as ‘land, other natural resources as well as scientific, technical and organisational knowledge’. He also describes growth as ‘the art of interrelating economic, social and political factors over time.’ Growth today is expressed as the amount of goods and services produced per head of the population over a period of time.

 

 

The late 1940s and the early 1950s were a period of great hope. Seventy years ago, the American atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki had done their work and they provided the illusion that war was outmoded. Postwar reconstruction was reaching a climax, full employment was an aspiration treasured by all politicians, and the welfare state was being put together as a fulfilment of the hopes of war-weary people. Environmental issues were on the horizon, but few people saw them coming. For the first time ever an elected government was able to promise its people a good life by quoting a magic figure. This feat was achieved by RA Butler, Chancellor of the Exchequer (Finance Minister) of the British government, in 1953: ‘He told the British people that their standard of life, with a 3 per cent growth rate, would double in 25 years.’

Over sixty years later this idea has now taken a grip on the world as a measure of economic progress. The ‘UK Economic Outlook, March 2018’ projects that ‘households will spend over 30% of their budget on housing and utilities by 2030, up from around 27% in 2017.’ The culture is to view this as good news, and why not? Promises of the good life lie behind such statements. At the other end of the growth spectrum are China, who have at times achieved double digit growth rates, and India who follow close behind. And again, why not? The people of these populous nations have a right to a higher standard of living and to be able to go shopping, illusory though this may be. The economic growth agenda that the international order has designed for itself has taxed ecosystems to such an extent that the process of global decay is now well underway. The potent mix of factors, not least of which is climate change, have been simmering for a while and are now coming to the boil.

The planet will recover in its own time, once we have done our mischief and are gone, but in the meantime we are in trouble. I have been around for nearly four-score years and ten and I have yet to see signs that the earth is growing. As far as I am aware, and people keep reminding me, if not stopped in time only cancer and the money supply can keep on growing forever. These two strange bedfellows also have another thing in common, in that if allowed to grow unchecked they will destroy their hosts. However, the growth of the former can be stopped by surgical incision but the latter, which in effect feeds the growth agenda, will need a different kind of surgery to stop it from killing its obese host. There is no Plimsoll line – a point at which we can all see that we are overloading the planet by these very processes.

Here is a perspective on growth from the New Economics Foundation: The most recent data on human use of bio-capacity sends a number of unfortunate signals for believers in the possibility of unrestrained growth. Our global ecological footprint is growing, further overshooting what the biosphere can provide and absorb, and in the process, like two trains heading in opposite directions, we appear to be actually shrinking the available bio capacity on which we depend.

This excerpt is from ‘Signs of the Earth – Islam, Modernity and the Climate Crisis’ by Fazlun Khalid

Report on Global Warming – Signs of the Earth

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

Report on Global Warming – Signs of the Earth

 

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has just issued a Special Report on Global Warming urging policy makers to limit global warming to 1.5°C. The scientists responsible for this report urged in its press release for “… rapid, far- reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society …”. Although the learned scientists make their appeal “… in the context of strengthening the global response to the threat of climate change, sustainable development, and efforts to eradicate poverty …”, the medicine they prescribe maybe hard to swallow but in my view it is nowhere near strong enough if what we really want is to return Earth systems to a semblance of balance.

Witness what is happening in the Congo as a consequence of our rush to divest from fossil fuels and drive electric cars. The Congo is one of the few places on the Earth that can supply the Cobalt in the quantity that is needed to manufacture the batteries that propel the electric cars we all aspire to be driving in the not too distant future. But at what cost? The environmental and social impact to this country to keep us mobile are dire. This report is not going to stop the production of the millions of cars we will all be driving in the future and in order to do this Cobalt is not the only mineral that we will be scouring the Earth for. Even if we manage to meet our climate targets the human race will continue on its course of wanton destruction of the planet.

But I cannot repeat often enough that there is an inherent urgency in what we face given the predictions by scientists of global systems collapse. What Muslims, who form over one-fifth of the world’s population, can offer the rest to mitigate the collapse and how soon we do it will have a bearing on how the human race will survive in a changed world. Equally, how the rest relate to planet Earth will have a bearing on Muslims, and the times call for a sensitivity to these common challenges in a shared space. The Islamic template provides us with a model whereby we could lead reasonably satisfactory lifestyles that meet our needs based on the prophetic tradition, where caring and sharing takes precedence over selfishness, personal aggrandisement and greed.

I take a radical view of these issues in my book and argue that modernity has created a huge divide between the human race and the natural world and that our behaviour manifests a total dislocation from it. I prescribe some strong medicine which if not taken in appropriate measure will make all the predictions in the IPCC report come true.

By Fazlun Khalid

You can learn more about Fazlun Khalid’s latest book ‘Signs on the Earth Islam, Modernity and the Climate Crisis‘ here.

Paperback  |  ISBN: 9781847740755 

Hardback  |  ISBN: 9781847740762

About the Author

Fazlun M Khalid Since 1992, has devoted himself to raising environmental consciousness among Muslims. In 1994, he founded the Islamic Foundation for Ecology and Environmental Sciences (IFEES) and over the years has been recognized through numerous awards and accolades as one of the world’s most important Islamic environmentalists. | http://www.ifees.org.uk/

In memory of Manzoor Khalid (1945–2018)

Written by R on . Posted in News and events

Manzoor Khalid (1945–2018)

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Hafiz Manzoor Khalid, a lover of books who committed himself to promoting Islamic literature and sharing the Qur’an.

Khalid, as he was known by friends and family, was born in 1945 in Peshawar, Pakistan. At an early age he memorised the Qur’an, completing his hifz at 14 in Gujranwala, Pakistan.

In July 1967 Khalid moved to Blackburn, where he settled and soon married. In Blackburn Khalid worked for an engineering firm making Singer sewing machines and helped to establish a UK Islamic Mission (UKIM) centre where he led Taraweeh prayers. In 1974 he moved from Blackburn to Manchester and was involved in founding Masjid Khizra, before returning to Pakistan to care for his father in 1978.

Masjid Khizra, Cheetham Hill, Manchester

After deciding to move back to the UK in 1981, Khalid was asked to run the UKIM bookshop in Drummond Street, London, as its manager. A position he held for 17 years. And one that shaped the remainder of his life.

Islamic Book Centre, Drummond Street, London (1999)

Numerous people, from academics to community activists, recall the times they visited the shop during those years. Hafiz Khalid’s personal attention and guidance led to conversions, marriages and much shared knowledge. His gentle enthusiasm and admirable manners never forgotten.

In the 90s Khalid left the Drummond Street Book Centre to work alongside Afsar Siddiqui at TaHa Publishing before becoming a bus driver in London. A position away from his beloved books.

Fortunately, one of the regular customers to Drummond Street came calling. Farooq Murad, restructuring the Islamic Foundation Publications at the time, asked if he would leave London and join the Islamic Foundation in Leicester as Marketing Executive. A position he happily accepted, relocating his young family to the Midlands.

At home promoting Islamic literature, Hafiz Khalid performed his role with dedication and care. Helping to increase its distribution, and in 2007, playing a pioneering role in the successful creation of Kube Publishing.

Islamic Foundation, Markfield

Nineteen years later he retired from Kube Publishing, leaving a legacy in British Muslim books that few will match. During this time, his community activism never ceased: he completed a chaplaincy course at MIHE in the 2000s and went on to perform nikahs, Friday khutbahs and regularly attend UKIM events.

All of us blessed to know him will remember his gentle nature, endless enthusiasm for ‘fantastic books’, his compassion and restraint, and his love for the Qur’an.

Despite his constant smile, Khalid spent his final years living with an unknown condition. He was eventually diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease, and left this world on the morning of 13th of October 2018. We pray that Allah forgives his shortcomings and raises him up to the highest rank in paradise.

Hafiz Manzoor Khalid leaves behind his wife, Shahida Khalid, three children, Suhaib, Uways and Nadiyah, and six grandchildren. May Allah grant them all strength, fortitude and patience.

 

Haris Ahmad, Managing Director of Kube:

‘Hafiz Khalid was a perfect gem. Apart from being a book lover he had impeccable people skills and everyone used to warm to him. Even after he retired, his customers used to often ask about him. Over the past year, although he had been unwell, he still offered to help in any way he could and kept thinking about ways to further the cause. His work at Kube/Islamic Foundation was a lot more than just a job. It was a part of his life that he cherished dearly and saw it as part of his route to pleasing Allah by spreading His word. May Allah accept Hafiz Khalid’s efforts and grant him the highest place in Jannah – Ameen. He will be deeply missed.’

 

If you would like to add a personal reflection about Hafiz Khalid please send it to info@kubepublishing.com.

Abdul Bari Book launch 2018

Book Launch – My Quest For The Middle Way – Finding The Balance in Islam

Written by R on . Posted in News and events

** FREE EVENT ** Book Launch **

Join us for a talk with Dr Abdul Bari author and community based activist,

on his

 Quest For The Middle Way

Finding The Balance In Islam

18:00–20:30pm, Friday 21 September, 2018

East London Mosque & London Muslim Centre

82-92 Whitechapel Road, London, E1 1JQ

MY Quest for the middle way

About the Event

Join us for a talk and book launch with the activist and community figure, Dr Muhammad Abdul Bari discussing his memoir, his personal journey being at the forefront of the British Muslim community’s most pressing challenges whilst trying to find the middle path.

Following the talk Dr Bari will be signing copies of his book: A Long Jihad – My Quest for the Middle Way

Refreshments will be provided!

If you’re coming by tube, the nearest stop is: Whitechapel – Parking may be available but there are very limited spaces.

About the Book

As the leader of Britian’s largest Muslim organisation and mosque, since that fateful day Abdul Bari has been at the forefront of the British Muslim community’s most pressing challenges. In this memoir, he offers an insider’s perspective on the Muslim experience in modern Britian, presenting his blueprint for ‘The Middle Way’.

He offers Muslims and everybody else guidance on a path that rejects extremism and works for the common good of all: living a life of moderation that is, as the Qur’an says, “justly balanced”.

About the Speaker

Muhammad Abdul Bari MBE is an educationalist, community activist, parenting consultant and author. He has written for various newspapers, blogs and journals. Moreover, he’s the author of a number of books on marriage, family, parenting, identity and community issues from contemporary British Muslim perspectives.

To reserve a seat click here or for more information, contact: rohail.sheikh@kubepublishing.com

Books on Hajj and Umrah

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

Books on Hajj and Umrah – Kube Publishing

Hajj is an Islamic religious pilgrimage (journey). Going for Hajj is the fifth pillar of Islam, required for those Muslims who can afford it. The Hajj is a serious of rituals, beginning and ending with worship at the Ka’aba. The Ka’aba is a stone building covered in a black cloth, located in Mecca, Saudia Arabia. It is the holiest site for Muslims. No matter where they are in the world, Muslims face in the direction of the Ka’aba to pray. Muslim tradition has it that everything in the universe, including animals and inanimate objects worship God.*

 

We’re off to make Umrah by Sana Munshey (age range 3-7)

Salam, my dear friends, I hope you are all well. If you’ve time to listen, I’ve something to tell, About the first mosque, A beautiful sight, Which we face when we pray, Where the noor shines bright… Discover the joys of Umrah when a brother and sister travel with their parents to the city of Mecca and perform this sacred ritual for the very first time.

‘Masya Allah… I cried reading this book. Umrah from the perspective of a young child. May Allah grant us a chance to visit the Holy Land, Insya Allah‘ Zatika, Goodreads

Colourful illustrations. Includes a poster and paper dolls for children to enact performing Umrah.

£4.99 – Hardback – 9780860374589


 

Yan’s Hajj The Journey of a Lifetime by Fawzi Gilani (age range 4-8)

Yann’s trip to perform Hajj turns into a journey that lasts a lifetime. This heart-warming tale is a great reminder to help others.

I really love Yan’s Hajj! I cried so much after I read it!” Ahliana, Little Tree Library.

I really cannot remember the last time I read an Islamic picture book that was this thoughtfully structured….I’m so glad to have this book to share with all the little ones in my life in the upcoming hajj season and all year round” Muslim Reads

£3.99 – Paperback – 9780860376231


 

A Little Tree Goes For Hajj – by Eman Salem (age range 3-7)

The little tree has always wanted to travel, especially to Mecca, to perform Hajj (an islamic religious pilgrimage). But how can he travel when his roots are in the ground?

Find out how his dream comes true, and he makes the journey of a lifetime.

A Little Tree Goes For Hajj is an ideal educational tool to introduce the Hajj to children who are learning about important rituals in different world religions; includes a glossary with short definitions and explanations for readers unfamiliar with Hajj.

£3.99 – Paperback – 9780986848117 –  Bilingual (English and Arabic text)


 

Makkah and Madina Activity book by Aysenur Gunes (age range 4-7)

Explore the wonders of Makkah and Madinah with this fun activity book. Features dot-to-dot drawings, colouring fun, puzzles to solve and 63 stickers to stick.

£2.99 – Paperback – 9780860375449


 

Handbook for Hajj and Umrah by Sarwar Alam Raz

This book aims to help prepare travellers for the sacred Pilgrimage itself. The rites of Hajj and Umrah are clearly explained, and relevant prayers and supplications are provided in both Arabic and English. However, A final chapter is provided detailing a visit to Madinah. Contains helpful charts, maps and diagrams in full colour.

£7.95 -Paperback – 9780860373407


 

My Little Prayer Mats

My Little Prayer Mats are perfect gifts to encourage children to pray. Padded for extra comfort, the mats feel soft and springy.

£15 each


*Introductory text is from ‘A Little Tree Goes To Hajj’

A Long Jihad - Interview

A Long Jihad – My Quest For The Middle Way – Meeting Author Dr Bari

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

Ian from East London Radio meets Dr Muhammad Abdul Bari, an author with strong East London connections, to discuss his fascinating book of memoirs ‘A Long Jihad – My Quest for the Middle Way


In an era of fanaticism and polarisation, Dr Bari’s life is an example of a prominent Western Muslim rejecting extremes and finding balance

In this memoir, Dr. Muhammad Abdul Bari asks us to look beyond the extremism and violence that all too often defines the Muslim community toward those, like himself, navigating a middle-way life. A path defined in Islam as the “natural way,”

ISBN: 9781847741172 – by Muhammad Abdul Bari – Available in paperback and hardback.

Read a sample of the book below!

Top 5 for under 5s!

Written by R on . Posted in Children's Books, From Kube Shelves

Top 5 for under 5s!

Here are some great books for children under 5 published by us!

1. My First Book About the Qur’an by Sara Khan

My First Book About The Quran Cover

“The perfect book to introduce children to the teachings in the Qur’an”

“The writer has done an outstanding job. Simple and captivating..The way the illustrator has captured the essence of the text and expressed it through illustrations is truly amazing.” Saniyasnain Khan, Director of Goodword Books

First Book About the Quran - Space

My First Book About the Qur’an: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children

Available here

Take a look inside!

Read a review

2. 5 pillars (board book) by Anwar Cara

Written in simple, rhyming language and accompanied with bold, colourful illustrations this book is perfect to introduce young children to the most important acts in Islam: the Five Pillars. Each spread features one of the Five Pillars: believing in Allah and His Messenger, praying, fasting, giving charity and performing Hajj.

5 Pillars Board Book

Available here

3. Allah Made Everything by Zain Bhikha

Allah Made Everything Cover

Allah Made Everything, the song book, is based on the lyrics of the well loved children’s song by renowned singer and songwriter Zain Bhikha. The song was first released in 2015, and together with the hit video, has become one of the most popular children’s songs across the world.

“May this delightful book bring as much joy to your home as the song, ‘Allah Made Everything’, and may you enjoy many precious hours discussing the world through the eyes of your child as you share the knowledge that we are all Allah’s beautiful creation.” Zain Bhikha (2018)

 

Allah Made Everything - Inside Image

Inside page

Available here

Take a look inside!

Listen to the nasheed!

4. I can… series (board book)

This set of colourfully illustrated board books introduces basic concepts of Islamic practice to young children while helping to strengthen their confidence and identities as Muslims.

I can series books

Available here

5. Allah gave me series

Delightful accounts of sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch, encouraging children to give thanks to the Creator.

Allah Made Everything Bundle

Available in the series:

-Allah Gave Me Two Eyes to See by Fatima D’Oyen
-Allah Gave Me a Tongue to Taste by Ayesha Jones
-Allah Gave Me a Nose to Smell by Rizwana Qamaruddin
-Allah Gave Me Two Hands and Feet by Raana Bokhari
-Allah Gave Me Two Ears to Hear by Amrana Arif

Available here

For more children’s books click over here

 

 

 

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