Best Books for 8-13 year olds

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in Uncategorized

This week, we’ve put together a list of some of our best books for 8-13 year olds.  These books are an excellent way for our younger readers to enjoy stories that they can relate to and learn from.  Don’t forget to let us know what you think of them!

 

I Wonder About The Prophet by Ozkan Oze

Have you ever wondered what the Prophet Muhammad believed before he became a prophet, why he is so important or why he is praised so often? You might wonder how he treated animals and children or if he performed miracles. All of these questions, and many more, are explored inside.

The I Wonder series give young readers answers to the BIG questions they have about Islam in brilliant little books. Written in a friendly and accessible style for today’s youth, these are essential companions for questioning young minds.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/i-wonder-about-the-prophet-book-three/

 

The Hijab Boutique by Michelle Khan

Farah enjoyed her private girls school until the day an assignment to bring in something representing her mother to talk about for International Woman’s Day. Compared to her friends’ glamorous actress and tap-dancing mothers, what can her modest, humble mother have that is worth sharing with her classmates? To her surprise, her mother was quite a business woman!

The Hijab Boutique is a wonderful book that will appeal to young readers

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/the-hijab-boutique-2/

 

The Great Race to Sycamore Street by J. Samia Mair

This topsy-turvy adventure on Sycamore Street sees brother and sister Hude and Amani arrive in the country with one thought: it was going to be  long, boring summer. They couldn’t be more wrong. With Grandma Hana’s new neighbour planning to pull down her prized peach tree and a gang, led by archer Bobby, marshalling the local lake, Hude and Amani have a hard time getting any peace.

In this warm and comical story, find out how, under the watchful eyes of Grandma Hana, Hude and Amani plan to save the peach tree and beat Bobby at his own game before leaving Sycamore Street behind.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/the-great-race-to-sycamore-street/

 

The Colour Blind Boy by Mohammed Yaseen

Abdullah has just moved to a new school. As a newcomer, he find himself victim of gang who starts bullying him. Help comes from an unexpected quarters, a new friendship is struck between Abdullah and his friend, together they confront the bullies and the friendship is developed in its true Islamic Meaning.

Available at https://www.islamic-foundation.com/shop/the-colour-blind-boy-2/

 

The Muslim All Stars: Helping the Polonskys by Khaleel Muhammad

Mr Polonsky, an angry old man, is desperate for help. His house is a mess and it needs cleaning before his wife returns home from a major operation. As a last resort he puts an advert in a local shop. A group of Muslim children come together to clean-up, but with time running out and a bigger mess than they had imagined … can they succeed?

Khaleel Muhammad is a well-known singer of nasheeds (Islamic songs). He has also written and produced his own successful audio adventure, The Adventures of Hakim. This is his first children’s book.    

Available at https://www.islamic-foundation.com/shop/the-muslim-all-stars-helping-the-polonsky39s-paperback-2/

 

The Quran in plain English: Part 30 with Surah al Fatihah

This newly revised, compact edition of the chapters of the Holy Quran that are most often memorized features an improved layout and font for easier reading, and is an ideal starter for children and teens. Rendered into contemporary, highly readable English with explanatory notes, glossary and a guide to further reading, it is highly recommended for homes, schools, libraries and madrasahs.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/the-quran-in-plain-english-part-30-revised-edition-2009-2/

 

The Victory Boys: Team Spirit by Jamal Orme

As Shabab Al-Nasr prepare to defend their trophy, in walks Amir, a player good enough to win it on his own! But for all his stunning skills, is he ready to become one of the team? And with Ibrahim battling jealousy and low self-confidence, can the Victory Boys find that winning team spirit once more?

Visit the official book blog: thevictoryboys.com

Read a sample on Issuu.

Watch the book trailer on Youtube!

Available at https://www.islamic-foundation.com/shop/the-victory-boys-team-spirit/

 

Ibrahim Khan and the Mystery of the Haunted Lake by Farheen Khan

The second book in a series of adventures. Ibrahim and Zayn find themselves challenged by an unexpected mystery during a class vacation at the beautiful, remote Camp Chimo. How can they catch the culprit and prove that the ghost terrifying their classmates is a hoax?

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/ibrahim-khan-and-the-mystery-of-the-haunted-lake/

 

 

 

 

 

Book Excerpt – ‘Muhammad: His Character and Conduct’

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in Uncategorized

Ramadhan Mubarak!

To celebrate the beginning of this holy month, we share with you an excerpt from Adil Salahi’s Muhammad: His Character and Conduct, an excellent source that highlights the beautiful character and conduct of the Messenger of Allah.

 

Muhammad: the man

So, what sort of man was Muhammad? The answer is that he was an ordinary man who, until he received God’s message, led a very ordinary life. He went through a difficult childhood, which saw him losing his father before he was born, his mother at the age of six and his grandfather two years later.

Yet, with all these losses he was not short of loving carers who could see that the young boy could have a bright future. He profoundly appreciated the love he was given, particularly by his uncle, Abu Talib, and Abu Talib’s wife, Fatimah bint Asad.

When Makkah endured some difficult times during Muhammad’s adult life, he sought to reduce Abu Talib’s burden, suggesting to another uncle, al- Abbas, that each of them should take one of Abu Talib’s children to look after.

To Muhammad, this was merely a gesture expressing gratitude for a favour that he had never forgotten.

From his early years, Muhammad had a keen sense of right and, trusting to his natural instincts, he pursued what was right in every possible way. He never told a lie and was always fair. Perhaps being deprived of the care that only kind parents could provide helped him to realize what loss meant to other people.

This might have encouraged him to try to prevent unwarranted loss by anyone: hence, his desire to pursue right and to enforce it by any fair means. He was an example of goodness, and long before prophethood, his reputation for honesty and fairness was second to none. His treatment of a slave lad given to him as a gift by his good wife was so benevolent that the lad preferred to stay with him to being reunited with his parents and family. To soften the blow for the lad’s disappointed father, Muhammad adopted the lad as a son, with full rights of inheritance.

Such was Muhammad before becoming aware of the role God wanted to assign to him. God then entrusted him with His message, which aims to provide a way of life for all mankind in all generations. By definition, this message taps into every good thing in man and enhances it; neutralizing or countering every negative trait. Muhammad (peace be upon him) was to become the role model for all future generations of humanity. His life after he became God’s Prophet and Messenger shows that he lived up to that. He was the teacher of all goodness. He defines his role in these simple words:

“I have been sent to bring good manners to perfection.” (Related by Ahmad, al-Bukhari in Al-Adab al- Mufrad, al-Hakim and al-Bayhaqi.)

His wife, A’ishah, describes his manners as a “practical implementation of the Qur’an.” (Related by Ahmad and al-Bayhaqi.)

The best description of his character is that given by God Himself:

“Most certainly, yours is a sublime character.” (68: 4)

Several ahadith, by different reporters, highlight the fact that the Prophet never used foul language. Anas ibn Malik reports: “God’s Messenger was not given to the use of foul language, cursing or abusive names. When he expressed displeasure with someone, he would say, ‘What is wrong with him; may he have dust on his forehead.’” (Related by al-Bukhari.)

In answer to a question about the Prophet’s manners, A’ishah said: “He never used foul or obscene language. Nor was he quarrelsome in the market place. He did not repay a bad turn with a similarly bad one, but would rather forgive and forebear.” (Related by Ahmad, al-Tirmidhi, al-Tabarani and al-Bayhaqi.) Another hadith mentions that Ata’ ibnYasar asked Abdullah ibn Amr about the Prophet’s description in the Torah. He said:

‘He is described in the Torah in similar terms as his description in the Qur’an. It says: “You, Prophet! We have sent you as a witness, one who brings happy news and gives warnings. You are a guardian for the Arabs. You are My servant and Messenger. I have called you al-Mutawakkil [i.e. one who puts his trust in God]. You do not use foul or hard language and are not quarrelsome in the market place. You do not repay evil with evil, but forgive and forbear. [This Messenger] shall not be gathered to God until God has brought the distorted faith back to its right form so that people will declare that ‘there is no deity other than God, opening with it blind eyes, deaf ears and hardened hearts.’” (Related by al-Bukhari.)

“May he have dust on his forehead” was an often-used metaphorical expression of displeasure. Its meaning has nothing to do with the literal sense of its words. Some linguists say that it is a prayer that the person concerned will be a devout person who prays often.

Some people put on an appearance when they are out and meet others. The Prophet, however, did not put any appearance other than his real manners. For example: “Some of his Companions visited Umm Salamah, his wife. They said to her: “Mother of the believers, tell us what is God’s Messenger like in the privacy of his home.” She said: “He is always the same in public and in private.” She then regretted answering them, feeling that she told them something that he might not wish to reveal. She reports: “When he came home, I told him.” He said: “You have done well.” (Related by Ahmad and al-Tabarani.)

These ahadith together give us a picture of a person who turns away from whatever is unbecoming and to whom good conduct comes naturally; he realizes that whatever comes from God is good. He is the first to implement it, at home and in public. The Prophet was the same in public and with his own family: he never used abusive or insulting language, cursed or engaged in a verbal quarrel. He was aware of his task of “bringing good manners to perfection.”

He had a generous nature. When, within the space of a few years, his fortunes changed – from being driven out of his hometown, with a great prize on his head, to being the undisputed master of the whole of Arabia – the Prophet could have led a most luxurious life. However, he preferred to lead a simple life, free of all pretences of power, grandeur or material luxury. At times, he could have plenty in his hand, but he would give it all away within a very short period of time. Jabir reports: “God’s Messenger never said, ‘No’, to anything he was asked.” Even when he and his family were in need, he would give away whatever he had. He did not mind eating the simplest of food. Anas reports: I took to the Prophet some barley bread and a little fat that had already started to go bad. He even pawned his body armour with a Jewish pawnbroker to buy some barley for his family. I heard him saying: “Muhammad’s family do not have even a small amount of wheat or grains.” He had nine wives at the time. (Related by al-Bukhari.)

It appears that the Prophet wanted to lead a very simple life, so that he would not be distinguished from the poor in his community. This fits with the Islamic view of this present life as transitory: it is the life to come that is more important, because it is everlasting and people’s lots in it are determined by what they do during their present life on earth. Another report that illustrates his interaction with his community is given by Uthman, who says: “We accompanied God’s Messenger in travel and in town. He would visit the sick, attend our funerals and fight with us. He would lend us support with whatever he had.” (Related by Ahmad and al-Bazzar.)

Some people think that the harder they drive themselves in fulfilling religious duties, the higher the position they will achieve in God’s eyes. Yet Islam does not require people to overstrain themselves, as it steers a middle way. Indeed, it is referred to, in some religious text as “the middle way.” The Prophet’s practical example shows that he understood this and put it into practice. A’ishah reports:

Whenever the Prophet was given a choice between two options, he would choose the easier, unless it be sinful. If it was sinful, he would move furthest away from it. Never did he seek revenge for himself. However, if something God has prohibited was violated, he would seek to avenge that for God’s sake. (Related by al-Bukhari and Muslim.)

A similar hadith mentions that God’s Messenger never beat anyone with his hand: he never beat a woman or a servant. [He used his hand] only when he was in jihad for God’s cause. Never did he avenge himself for something done to him. Only when something God has prohibited was violated he would seek to avenge that for God’s sake. (Related by Muslim.)

The Prophet’s character shines as being that of a very modest man who never sought to press an advantage in anyway. At the same time, he was clearly dedicated to his message and would do everything in his power to ensure that people understood it clearly and could see how to put it into practice. He felt for others and would try hard to make it easy for them to understand God’s message and implement what He required of them. In his speech during the farewell pilgrimage, for example, he outlined the major principles of Islam. At the end of every point he stressed, he would ask his audience: “Have I delivered God’s message?” When they affirmed that he had done, he appealed to God to witness their acknowledgement.

The Prophet’s modesty was apparent in the way he treated his followers. He realized that his Companions would be emulated by later generations of Muslims. Hence, he made sure to explain how he should be treated by them and by all Muslims. Umar ibn al-Khattab quotes him as saying: “Do not overpraise me like the Christians overpraise Jesus, son of Mary. I am only a servant of God. [In reference to me] say: God’s servant and Messenger.” (Related by al-Bukhari and Ibn Hibban.) How did they react to this? Anas ibn Malik says: “No one was dearer to them than God’s Messenger. Yet when they saw him coming, they did not stand up because they knew he disliked that.” (Related by Ahmad and al- Tirmidhi.) He wanted to be seen as one of them.

The Prophet also impressed on his Companions that people distinguish themselves only by their manners and behaviour. In his address during his farewell pilgrimage, he said:

People, your Lord is one and your father is one. No Arab has an advantage over a non-Arab, nor a non-Arab over an Arab; nor does a red skinned man over a black one, nor a black one over a red skinned one, except through God-fearing. (Related by Ahmad.)

What can we say in conclusion? Whatever praise we may say will always fall short of what Muhammad, God’s Messenger, deserves. He was the man who showed the way, and he taught goodness to humanity so that he would fulfil the aim of his mission that he expressed in his own words: “I have been sent so that I would bring good manners to perfection.”

Peace and God’s blessings be to Muhammad, God’s servant and Messenger.

 

Book available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/muhammad-his-character-and-conduct/

#ReadInRamadan – 2018

Written by R on . Posted in Read in Ramadan

header #ReadInRamadan

Ramadan is approaching or is already here or has past (depending on when you’re reading this) and here at Kube we would like to continue to encourage more people to read as well as share what you’re reading during this blessed month.

The #ReadInRamadan is used to encourage people, businesses and other publishers to share and talk about which books are inspiring them and to give more books as gifts during Ramadan or for Eid. As our communities strive to seek knowledge and reflect on the wisdom of Islam, we want to celebrate the increasing number of books available on Islam and the Muslim experience, and what better way to do this than by giving a book as a gift.

Reading can aid reflection, broaden understanding and ultimately enhance your experience of this holy month. By carefully choosing some books to read alongside the Qur’an, you can also make Ramadan a transformational time to uplift your spirit and strengthen your belief. Books are also a great way of introducing Ramadan to your children, as they provide the perfect platform for shared discussion and contemplation in an enjoyable and engaging way.

We want you to use the hashtag #ReadInRamadan and tell us what is on your reading or gift list!

Got a Kube book on your wishlist? You can WIN one for free! We’ve got giveaways to announce throughout the month of Ramadan on social media.

Come and join the discussion on: Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to join in with the discussion and find out what others are reading too!

Useful resources:

Pre-Ramadan Reading List

Top 10 Reads for Ramadan!

Top 5 for under 5s!

Best Books for Muslim Teens

 

Best Books for Muslim Teenagers

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in Uncategorized

From the thrilling world of Ibn Sina to the fictional realm of Muslim romance, this list of books for Muslim teenagers has something for everyone! Read about the books below and find more information through following the links.

 

When Wings Expand by Mehded Maryam Sinclair

She wrapped her arms around me and said, “Nur! I know. I don’t want to go. But all I can do is keep trusting in Allah. Nur, I will always be with you! My love and advice will always be with you to guide you in the right direction.” She patted my heart. “They are forever sealed inside this little place.”

Writing on the pages of her journal, Nur, a teenage girl in Canada, charts the onset and advance of her mother’s cancer. Nur watches her mother’s body begin to shrink and her mood begin to darken. And when family and friends begin to encroach, Nur must face the prospect of her mother’s looming death. Nur bears the crushing loss and finds her adolescent life more demanding and complex. But with the legacy of her mother’s love, her family’s support, and the guidance of her faith, she manages to overcome the searing pain and use her newfound strength to bring joy to the lives of others, showing them that after death wings can expand.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/when-wings-expand/

 

Ibn Sina: A Concise Life by Edoardo Albert

Ibn Sina, who is referred to as Avicenna in Latin, was a true polymath. Born in the tenth Century, his passion for knowledge was unbound, and he made lasting contributions to medicine, maths and philosophy.

He served under princes and kings (and fled from them too), wrote books of philosophy that are still argued over today and set down medical treatments that continue in use. As such, Ibn Sina is often referred to as the most brilliant Muslim thinker in Islam’s Golden Age.

With illustrations, photographs, and maps, the rich and diverse world that produced Ibn Sina is vividly brought alive.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/ibn-sina-a-concise-life/

 

Tales from Rumi: Mathnawi Selections for Young Readers

A collection of stories from Rumi’s classic opus “The Mathnawi”, this astounding compilation of over 24,000 verses is carefully adapted for younger audiences. Best known for his spiritual poetry and the whirling dance of sufi practice he inspired, Rumi’s influence continues to spread around the world.

Available at https://www.islamic-foundation.com/shop/tales-from-rumi-mathnawi-selections-for-young-readers-2/

 

She Wore Red Trainers by Na’ima Robert

When Ali first meets Amirah, he notices everything about her – her hijab, her long eyelashes and her red trainers – in the time it takes to have one look, before lowering his gaze. And, although Ali is still coming to terms with the loss of his mother and exploring his identity as a Muslim, and although Amirah has sworn never to get married, they can’t stop thinking about each other.

Can Ali and Amirah ever have a halal ‘happily ever after’?

Written by an award-winning author, this unique romance explores the possibilities and passions young Muslims face when falling in love.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/she-wore-red-trainers/

 

The War within Our Hearts by Habeeb Quadri and Sa’ad Quadri

The War within Our Hearts is not just another book about Muslim young people. It is a book written for young Muslims addressing issues they can relate to and in a language that is their own. Covering the key issues for young Muslims in the west today including dating, music, internet, this is a book everyone should have. It also has an introduction by Imam Zaid Shakir.

Available at http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/the-war-within-our-hearts-2

 

The Age of Bliss series

The Age of Bliss series contains biographies of luminous Muslims, from the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) to Aisha bint Abu Bakr (RA) to Hasan and Husayn ibn Ali (RA). Explore the books in the series here: https://www.islamic-foundation.com/?post_type=product&s=age+of+bliss&post_type=product

 

 

Don’t forget to let us know what you think and tag us in your pictures! #ReadInRamadan

Top 10 Ramadan Reads

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in Uncategorized

What will you #ReadInRamadan?

With Ramadan only around the corner, we’ve compiled a list of our top 10 reads to give you some inspiration!

 

Communicating with Allah: Rediscovering Prayer by Dr Bassem Saeh

Muslims are required to pray five times a day, but for too many of us these are little more than physical movements devoid of any spirit or divine connection In contrast, the Prophet (SAW) characterised prayer as “the spiritual ascent (mi’raj) of the believer”. In a modern world of constant distraction, how are we to achieve the communion with the Divine that prayer is supposed to be?

This short but valuable work casts a refreshing new perspective on prayer in the modern context. With practical examples, and in contemporary idiom, Dr Bassem Saeh charts a path for the seeker of God’s pleasure to attain a deeper sense of consciousness and devotion in prayer. The short chapters of this work are designed to be read and reread as constant reminders for us to renew our commitment to the Divine in our prayer.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/communicating-with-allah-rediscovering-prayer/

 

Al-Adab al-Mufrad – A Perfect Code of Manners and Morality by Adil Salahi

Al-Adab al-Mufrad is the most famous collection of Prophetic traditions on manners and morals. The anthology of 1329 hadiths is a treasured work in Muslim history by one of its most respected scholars, Imam Bukhari.

This edition, newly translated by Adil Salahi, includes a contemporary commentary on each topical collection of hadiths, clearly emphasising the relevance of the Prophet’s teachings in our modern and complex societies. This pioneering addition marks it out as perhaps the first English work commenting on and explaining a full anthology of hadiths.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/al-adab-al-mufrad-a-perfect-code-of-manners-and-morality/

 

7 Steps to Spiritual Intelligence by Musharraf Hussain     

How do we develop a spiritual life? How do we change ourselves so that we can live by the universal spiritual values of Islam? 7 Steps to Spiritual Intelligence tells us how to come closer to God in seven steps: through genuine seeking of God, discipleship of a spiritual director, learning and understanding spiritual intelligence, simplicity and contentment, striving to practise, remembering God and praying to Him, and self-inspection and self-control.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/seven-steps-to-spiritual-intelligence/

 

A Treasury of Ghazali: A Companion for the Untethered Soul by Mustafa Abu Sway

Abū Ḥāmid al-Ghazālī has been described by some scholars as the greatest Muslim in Islamic history. His prolific works, written over the duration of his relatively short lifetime, have deeply influenced Islamic thought for nearly a thousand years.

This short volume, written by one of the world’s leading experts on al-Ghazālī, comprises forty gems from al-Ghazālī’s inexhaustible treasury of writings, that give the modern reader insights into both the richness of al-Ghazālī’s thought, and how they can better help us understand Islam today.

 

“I’m one of those people that loves a bit of wise philosophy – and when that is equipped with Islam – my heart just finds solace. This book offers guidance, practical tips and most importantly encourages one to think about themselves in a deep manner – that we often don’t get to do because of all our responsibilities. This book seeks to take the soul out of muddled-ness and give it direction.”  Gilded Dunya https://gildeddunya.com/2017/11/14/a-treasury-of-ghazali-book-review/

Read a sample of the book here.

 

In The Early Hours by Khurram Murad

In the Early Hours is a collection of inspirational advice by a dear and beloved teacher, Ustadh Khurram Murad, on the subject of spiritual and self development.  

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/in-the-early-hours/

 

 

Revive Your Heart By Nouman Ali Khan

Revive Your Heart is a call for spiritual renewal and an invitation to have a conversation with one of the world’s most recognisable voices on Islam, Nouman Ali Khan.

This collection of essays is disarmingly simple, yet it challenges us to change— to revise our actions, our assumptions, and our beliefs so we can be transformed from within, as well as externally. It aims to help modern Muslims maintain a spiritual connection with Allah and to address the challenges facing believers today: the disunity in the Muslim community, terrorists acting in the name of Islam, and the disconnection with Allah.

These challenges and more are tackled by Nouman Ali Khan, with his profound engagement with the Qur’an, in his trademark voice that is sought out by millions of Muslims on a daily basis.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/revive-your-heart-nouman-ali-khan-hardback/

 

Dying and Living for Allah: The Last Will of Khurram Murad

Dying and Living for Allah: The Last Will of Khurram Murad is essentially a wake up call, not just to his kith and kin, but to all Muslims. In accordance with the Qur’an and Sunnah, this Will is a nasihah – advising, commending and enjoining a life based on loyalty to Allah, striving for the Akhirah, being particular to one’s responsibilities towards others and sharing the divine message with all human beings.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/dying-and-living-for-allah-the-last-will-of-khurram-murad-ebook/

 

Daily Wisdom: Selections from the Holy Qur’an by Abdur Raheem Kidwai

This beautiful presentation of the Holy Quran engages the reader in a moment daily reflection. With 365 verses covering the whole year, this is a must for every home. An essential companion to the first book “Daily Wisdom: Sayings of the Prophet Muhammad”.Daily Wisdom Set - Kube Publishing - Islamic Books

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/daily-wisdom-selections-from-the-holy-quran/                                                              

      

Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship by Al-Ghazali

Inner Dimensions of Islamic Worship covers the dimensions of Islamic rituals of worship which are essential to the fulfilment of inner quality. This book will be of immense help to countless young men and women of our times, who are rapidly growing in their commitment to Islam.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/inner-dimensions-of-islamic-worship/

 

Tazkiyah: The Islamic Path of Self Development by Abdur Rashid Siddiqui

There is hardly any book in English that covers self-development from an authentic Islamic perspective. Yet, tazkiyah, self-development, lies at the core of Islamic life and there is need for a practical manual in English to assist those who want to achieve self-development by purifying their souls and actions. This anthology has been compiled to meet this need, by translating works that originally appeared in Urdu. It includes key contributions presented by well-known leaders of the Islamic Movement: Mawlana Mawdudi, Ustadh Khurram Murad and others.

Find the book here: http://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/tazkiyah-the-islamic-path-of-self-development-2/

 

 

Happy reading and don’t forget to tweet us with your #ReadInRamadan pictures!

Way to the Qur’an – Living the Qur’an

Written by Humairaa on . Posted in Uncategorized

How can the Qur’an benefit to your life?

This short excerpt from Way to the Qur’an by Khurram Murad, a renowned teacher who spent 40 years in the spiritual teaching and training of thousands of young Muslims around the globe, explores how to read the Qur’an so that it makes a positive impact on your life.

 

Living the Qur’an

Obeying the Qur’an

Reading the Qur’an will be of little benefit to you; it may even bring misery and harm, unless you, from the first moment, begin to change and reconstruct your life in total surrender to God who has given you the Qur’an. Without the will and striving to act, neither the states of heart and enraptures of the soul, nor the ecstasies of mood, nor intellectual enrichment will be of any use to you. If the Qur’an does not have any impact upon your actions and if you do not obey what it enjoins and avoid what it prohibits, then you are not getting nearer to it.

On every page of the Qur’an is an invitation to surrender and submit, to act and change. At every step the reader is confronted – to decide and commit himself. Those who do not submit to it are declared to be Kafir, zalim (wrongdoer) and fasiq (iniquitous) ( al-Maidah 5:44-7). Those who are given the Book of God but do not understand it nor act upon it are described as ‘asses which carry loads’, but neither know nor benefit from what they carry ( al-Jumuah 65:5). They are those against whom the Prophet, blessings and peace be on him, will plead on the Day of Judgement:

O my Lord! Behold, [some of] my people have taken this Qur’an as a thing to be shunned (al-Furqan 25:30).

To shun the Qur’an, to leave it, and to put it aside, means not to read it, not to understand it, not to live by it, to consider it a ‘thing of the past’, which has ceased to be relevant.

The Prophet, blessings and peace be on him, is no less emphatic in stressing the necessity of obeying the Qur’an:

Many of the hypocrites in my Ummah will be from among the readers of the Qur’an (Ahmad).

He is not a true believer in the Qur’an who treats as halal (permissible) what it has made haram (prohibited) (Tirmidhi).

Read the Qur’an so that it enables you to desist (from what it prohibits]. If it does not enable you to desist you have not really read it (Tabarani).

For the Companions of the Prophet, to learn the Qur’an amounted to reading it, pondering over it, and acting by it. It is narrated that :

Those who were engaged in reading the Qur’an told that people like ‘Uthman Ibn ‘Affan and Abdullah Ibn Masud, once they had learnt ten verses from the Prophet, blessings and peace be on him, did not go any further unless they had really ‘learnt’ whatever these verses contained by way of knowledge and practice [understood them and acted upon them]. They used to say that they learnt the Qur’an and knowledge together. That is how they sometimes spent years in learning only one Surah (al-Itqan fi ‘Ulum al-Qur’an, Suyuti).

Al-Hasan al-Basri said : ‘ You have taken the night to be a camel that you ride on to pass through various stages of the Qur’an. Those before you considered it as messages from their Lord; they pondered over them at night and lived by them by day’ (Ihya).

Reading the Qur’an should induce faith inside your heart; that faith should shape your lives. It is not a gradual, piecemeal process, by which you first spend years reading the Qur’an, then understanding it and strengthening your faith, you only then act upon it. The whole is one unified process, all things take place simultaneously. As you hear or receive the words, they kindle faith inside you; as you have faith inside you, your life begins to change.

What you must remember is that to live by the Qur’an requires a major decision on your part: you have to completely alter the course of your life, irrespective of what may be the dominant thought-patterns around you, of what your society may be dictating, or what others may be doing. This decision requires major sacrifices. But unless you, as believers in the Qur’an being the word of God, are prepared to take the plunge, not much good will come out of the time you spend with the Qur’an.

From the very first moment, at the first step, it is made abundantly clear that the Qur’an is a guidance for those who are prepared to act to save themselves from the harm that comes from living against God’s will, from earning His displeasure, and who fear the consequences – they are the al-muttaqin (al Baqarah 2: 1-5). The Qur’an does not recognize any polarity between knowledge and action, between faith (Iman) and righteous deeds (al-amal al-salih).

 

Find the book, and more information about it, here: https://www.kubepublishing.com/shop/way-to-the-quran/

 

Top 5 for under 5s!

Written by R on . Posted in Children's Books, From Kube Shelves

Top 5 for under 5s!

Here are some great books for children under 5 published by us!

1. My First Book About the Qur’an by Sara Khan

My First Book About The Quran Cover

“The perfect book to introduce children to the teachings in the Qur’an”

“The writer has done an outstanding job. Simple and captivating..The way the illustrator has captured the essence of the text and expressed it through illustrations is truly amazing.” Saniyasnain Khan, Director of Goodword Books

First Book About the Quran - Space

My First Book About the Qur’an: Teachings for Toddlers and Young Children

Available here

Take a look inside!

Read a review

2. 5 pillars (board book) by Anwar Cara

Written in simple, rhyming language and accompanied with bold, colourful illustrations this book is perfect to introduce young children to the most important acts in Islam: the Five Pillars. Each spread features one of the Five Pillars: believing in Allah and His Messenger, praying, fasting, giving charity and performing Hajj.

5 Pillars Board Book

Available here

3. Allah Made Everything by Zain Bhikha

Allah Made Everything Cover

Allah Made Everything, the song book, is based on the lyrics of the well loved children’s song by renowned singer and songwriter Zain Bhikha. The song was first released in 2015, and together with the hit video, has become one of the most popular children’s songs across the world.

“May this delightful book bring as much joy to your home as the song, ‘Allah Made Everything’, and may you enjoy many precious hours discussing the world through the eyes of your child as you share the knowledge that we are all Allah’s beautiful creation.” Zain Bhikha (2018)

 

Allah Made Everything - Inside Image

Inside page

Available here

Take a look inside!

Listen to the nasheed!

4. I can… series (board book)

This set of colourfully illustrated board books introduces basic concepts of Islamic practice to young children while helping to strengthen their confidence and identities as Muslims.

I can series books

Available here

5. Allah gave me series

Delightful accounts of sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch, encouraging children to give thanks to the Creator.

Allah Made Everything Bundle

Available in the series:

-Allah Gave Me Two Eyes to See by Fatima D’Oyen
-Allah Gave Me a Tongue to Taste by Ayesha Jones
-Allah Gave Me a Nose to Smell by Rizwana Qamaruddin
-Allah Gave Me Two Hands and Feet by Raana Bokhari
-Allah Gave Me Two Ears to Hear by Amrana Arif

Available here

For more children’s books click over here

 

 

 

Allah Made Everything Cover

New Book By Zain Bhikha – Allah Made Everything Published by Kube Publishing

Written by R on . Posted in Children's Books

Allah Made Everything!

Allah Made Everything, the song book, is based on the lyrics of the well loved children’s song by renowned singer and songwriter Zain Bhikha. The song was first released in 2015, and together with the hit video, has become one of the most popular children’s songs across the world.

Allah Made Everything - Inside Image

“May this delightful book bring as much joy to your home as the song, ‘Allah Made Everything‘ and may you enjoy many precious hours discussing the world through the eyes of your child as you share the knowledge that we are all Allah’s beautiful creation.” Zain Bhikha (2018)

Inside page - Allah Made Everything Nasheed 2018

Say: “Who is the Lord and Sustainer of the Heavens and the Earth?”

Say: “It is Allah.” … “Allah is the creator of all things: He is the One, the Supreme and Irresistible.”

Surah Al-Ra’d 13 Verse 16

Read a sample Here:

 

About Zain Bhikha:

Zain Bhikha is a South African singer-songwriter who performs Islamic nasheed songs, was born in Pretoria, South Africa. Zain was musically inclined from a young age and often commended for his melodious singing voice. Associated with other Muslim musicians, including Yusuf Islam and Dawud Wharnsby, Bhikha has collaborated on albums and also released several solo albums..

Zain Bhikha’s songs proved to be popular throughout South Africa, especially with young children who found them educational and inspiring. As the interest in his music grew, his albums began to filter abroad. In 2005 Zain established a South African based production company called Zain Bhikha Studios to house all of his enterprises and also give local and international artists the platform to gain exposure to global markets. Today, Zain Bhikha Studios is a non-profit organisation and all proceeds from Zain’s album sales and shows go towards deserving charities. Inside page

Under his own label, Zain Bhikha has released many albums, singles and a video autobiography. His albums have featured consistently amongst the top ten best Muslim Artists. His artistically produced videos have appeared on television channels throughout the world and on his YouTube channel.

Sing a long here:

This is the first in a series of books, games and other media under the Zeebee Kids label. Zeebee Kids is a division of Zain Bhikha Studios. For more information, visit www.zeebeekids.com.

Buy the Book here

Text and Lyrics Zain Bhikha

Illustrated by Azra Momin

28 Pages of

Binding: Hardback

ISBN: 9780860377702

 

Books published in partnership with The Islamic Foundation, an imprint of Kube Publishing.

Women In the Quran - Book Cover

The language of the Quran, a masculine language?

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves

WHEN THE QURAN SPEAKS TO WOMEN  Blue Hijab

The language of the Qur’an, a masculine language?

We’ve seen how the Qur’an speaks about women, through the examples of illustrious female characters, depicted with great subtleness, beauty and eloquence.

Here, the Divine word comes to counter what social prejudice continues to support in the name of a universally accepted sacrality; that of the discrimination against women, structurally weaker beings, destined to subordination.

Through these Qur’anic stories about women, one perceives a constant desire to recognise and appreciate this consistently assailed feminine identity. Women as vectors of faith, which was a new conception of femininity and in particular the anticipated announcement of a project of liberation, replete with meaning, for the climate of the time.

Sister reflecting at the river

It is especially important to bear in mind the framework of revelation, that of an intransigent patriarchal context where women were all but a human being worthy of dignity. It is at the heart of this Bedouin society with its very harsh mores, its implacably misogynistic ancestral customs and which ignores the feminine being, that the Qur’an reveals its feminine models of Muslim women, believing, intelligent. Qur’anic image of sovereign enlightened women, of saints, educators, scholars, resistors, passionate figures as we discover them through Balkis, Maryam, Asiah and all the others.
Beside this Divine speech talking about women, there is that which speaks to women, directly, personally and solemnly … .It is true that the Qur’an is the Divine word destined for all human beings regardless of their gender, their ethnicity or their colour, a speech which addresses human beings in what is most noble in their soul: their reason and their intellect.

Woman walking by wall

Muslim scholars more or less agree that the masculine language expressed in the Qur’an systemically includes the feminine gender and that Divine words in general speak to both women and men, without any distinction. The masculine gender in the Qur’an is used as a neutral gender and the formalisation of masculine language implies human universality. The term ‘men’ or, rijal in Arabic is polysemous and also signifies an elite of men and women. This linguistic characteristic is moreover not exclusive to the Arabic language as it is used in the Qur’an. All the other universal languages use masculine as a neutral gender. Does the term ‘men’ in English not also encompass human beings in general? This formalisation of the word man as a universal category is actually being questioned today. This is the case when it comes to the terminology used in the universal charter of Human Rights which many are currently seeking to reform.
Nonetheless, the Qur’anic text uses the feminine gender in very precise circumstances and employs a strictly feminine language in this case, where the discourse involves calling on women specifically to respond to quests emanating from a given context or right an injustice committed against them. It is a Divine word which descends from the high Heavens specifically for them as if to better free them, better emancipate them from outdated customs, give them a new breath … as if to better love them also.

 

This excerpt is from page 91, Women In The Qur’an – An Emancipatory Reading by Asma Lamrabet translation by Myriam Francois-Carrah

Women In the Quran - Book Cover

  • ISBN: 9780993516610
  • Pages: 212
  • Paperback and Hardback
  • Published: 2016

 

Living with the Qur'an - Kube Publishing

Living with the Qur’an

Written by R on . Posted in From Kube Shelves, Read in Ramadan

Living and obeying the Qur’an

Reading the Qur’an will be of little benefit to you, it may even bring misery and harm, unless you, from the first moment, begin to change and reconstruct your life in total surrender to God who has given you the Qur’an. Without the will and striving to act, neither the states of heart and enraptures of the soul, nor the ecstasies of mood, nor intellectual enrichment will be of any use to you. If the Qur’an does not have any impact upon your actions and if you do not obey what it enjoins and avoid what it prohibits, then you are not getting nearer to it.

On every page of the Qur’an is an invitation to surrender and submit, to act and change. At every step the reader is confronted – to decide and commit himself. Those who do not submit to it are declared to be Kafir, zalim (wrongdoer) and fasiq (iniquitous) ( al-Maidah 5:44-7). Those who are given the Book of God but do not understand it nor act upon it are described as ‘asses which carry loads’, but neither know nor benefit from what they carry’ ( al-Jumuah 65:5). They are those against whom the Prophet, blessings and peace be on him, will plead on the Day of Judgement:

O my Lord! Behold, [some of] my people have taken this Qur’an as a thing to be shunned (al-Furqan 25:30).

Way to the Quran

To shun the Qur’an, to leave it, and to put it aside, means not to read it, not to understand it, not to live by it, to consider it a ‘thing of the past’, which has ceased to be relevant.

The Prophet, blessings and peace be on him, is no less emphatic in stressing the necessity of obeying the Qur’an:

Many of the hypocrites in my Ummah will be from among the readers of the Qur’an (Ahmad).

He is not a true believer in the Qur’an who treats as halal (permissible) what it has made haram (prohibited) (Tirmidhi).

Read the Qur’an so that it enables you to desist (from what it prohibits]. If it does not enable you to desist you have not really read it (Tabarani).

Living with the Qur'an - Kube Publishing

For the Companions of the Prophet, to learn the Qur’an amounted to reading it, pondering over it, and acting by it. It is narrated that :

Those who were engaged in reading the Qur’an told that people like ‘Uthman Ibn ‘Affan and Abdullah Ibn Masud, once they had learnt ten verses from the Prophet, blessings and peace be on him, did not go any further unless they had really ‘learnt’ whatever these verses contained by way of knowledge and practice [understood them and acted upon them]. They used to say that they learnt the Qur’an and knowledge together. That is how they sometimes spent years in learning only one Surah (al-Itqan fi ‘Ulum al-Qur’an, Suyuti).

Al-Hasan al-Basri said : ‘ You have taken the night to be a camel that you ride on to you to pass through various stages of the Qur’an. Those before you considered it as messages from their Lord; they pondered over them at night and lived by them by day’ (Ihya).

Reading the Qur’an should induce faith inside your heart; that faith should shape your lives. It is not gradual, piecemeal process, by which you first spend years reading the Qur’an, then understanding it and strengthening your faith, you only then act upon it. The whole is one unified process, all things take place simultaneously. As you hear or receive the words, they kindle faith inside you; as you have faith inside you, your life begins to change.

What you must remember is that to live by the Qur’an requires a major decision on your part: you have to completely alter the course of your life, irrespective of what may be the dominant thought-patterns around you, of what your society may be dictating, or what others may be doing. This decision requires major sacrifices. But unless you, as believers in the Qur’an being the word of God, are prepared to take the plunge, not much good will come out of the time you spend with the Qur’an.

From the very first moment, at the first step, it is made abundantly clear that the Qur’an is a guidance for those who are prepared to act to save themselves from the harm that comes from living against God’s will, from earning His displeasure, and who fear the consequences – they are the al-muttaqin (al Baqarah 2: 1-5). The Qur’an does not recognize any polarity between knowledge and action, between faith (Iman) and righteous deeds (al-amal al-salih).

This excerpt was taken from ‘Way To The Qur’an’ by Khurram Murad

 

How to Turn Your Passion for Writing and Islam into a Career

Written by R on . Posted in Uncategorized

How to Turn Your Passion for Writing and Islam into a Career

Knowledge is one of the most important underpinnings of law and faith. In a famous Hadith, the Prophet (SAW) said, ‘To seek knowledge is an obligation upon every believer’. There are numerous ways that knowledge is exchanged, disseminated, discussed – and literature is one of the essential ways this is done.

Many Muslims find that their interest in spirituality and the light of Islam is intertwined with a keen interest in the beauty and metaphor of Islamic literature. The Holy Qur’an – the word of the Almighty – itself contains the most unique, most eloquent words – words which could never have been constructed by man.

There is a vast and extensive Islamic scholarly tradition, with countless books on Islamic jurisprudence, theology and law. This is compounded by literature in other forms, like poetry. Islam itself places an emphasis on using precise language. If you feel drawn to this scholarly tradition, then you might be able to use your love of both writing and Islam to enhance your career.

 

Sticking to Your Passions

When you are engaged in an activity that is meaningful, you thrive and feel motivated. In psychology, this is known as a ‘flow state’. You might have felt this when you’re fully engaged with a fulfilling task or reading a fascinating book. Somehow, without you knowing it, hours have passed. If you achieve this state when writing about Islam, then you know that this could be work that you could stick to.

Writing about Islam can take many different forms. If you are skilled at writing journalistic pieces, then you can use your talent to address topics of interest in Islam. If you enjoy writing blog posts, your writing could be a means of reflection. If poetry’s your thing – then by all means, take inspiration from one of the most famous poets, Mawlana Jalaluddin Rumi, and explore your religion thus.

When selecting a new hobby, you’ll have noticed that you keep going with those which are naturally enjoyable and produce this flow state. If writing falls under this category, then perhaps it’s worth wondering if you can charge for it.

 

Where to Find Work

There is a greater need for written content than ever and, with Muslim populations rising in the West, increasing demand for Islamic literature. A good place to start is with your own blog. There are numerous blogs, varying as widely in content as in style and form – such as Ayeina, which is an inspiring blog developed with the intention of self-reflection and self development.  A possible place for inspiration on where to begin your writing journey is the Muslim Writers Club (http://muslimwritersclub.com/) where writers share valuable information about the art as well as the business of publishing.

You can also keep your eyes open for print magazine and newspapers. Check if they accept submissions and if they offer payment. Keep a list of those which look interesting and carefully study their audience before writing a piece for them.

If your children or younger siblings love to write, why not encourage and challenge them to submit their work to the Young Muslim Writers Awards (https://ymwa.org.uk/) It’s a great platform to promote their love of writing and develop their literacy skills.

Keep Going!

Finding work as a writer can be difficult and beginners will often feel disheartened by their first few rejections. However, you have a niche in Islamic writing which can help you stand out. Keep studying your passions and practicing your writing and you’ll make progress.

Becoming a writer can be a dream come true for many people. If you have a real passion for writing about Islam, then it is possible to turn it into a full-time career or at least a side job. Be persistent and perfect your craft for the greatest chance of success. As the Hadith goes – ‘Actions are according to intentions’. Focus your intention and Insha’Allah you will turn your passion for writing and Islam into a career!

By Jane Sandwood

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers:

£0.000 items